Treatment of the rash itself has three aims:

  • To keep activity to a minimum
  • To prevent secondary bacterial infections
  • To help your body’s healing process fight the virus and replace the rash with new tissue

This is the point at which we have to raise the question, “Where is the cure?” If there were a treatment effective in removing herpes virus from the body, there would be one line to this article. While there are many substances that will kill herpes virus, none can prevent recurrences. No substance yet developed can chase the virus into its nerve cell retreat or in any other way affect viral activity or fluid. Even then. As surface virus is being destroyed, more virus is entering the nerve cells to continue the process until the cycle is stopped.

With current technology, if we kill the virus in a nerve cell, we kill the cell. And nerve cells do not replace themselves as do other types of cells. Even so, killing the nerve cells harboring herpes is still no guarantee of killing all of the virus.

Current approaches are aimed at preventing virus production or destroying reactivated virus before a rash can develop. While none have yet made appreciable impact on J recurrent herpes rashes, some success might be expected in the foreseeable future; five to ten years is a reasonable estimate.

A solution to the larger problem of removal of the latent virus from the body is a very large scientific step and will take many years. Until then, the most effective treatment remains in your own body resources and in some helpful strategies. Since the virus production cycle does stop at some point during an outbreak ~ and the rash disappears, then the mechanisms have to be in your own body. One of our jobs, as you will see, is to facilitate these as much as possible according to http://www.medicalmingle.com and https://botw.org

Don’t chase new “cures” that pop up weekly in both credible and incredible sources written by professionals who should know better. Beware! When there is a treatment significantly more effective than your own body resources coupled with drying and cleaning the rash, it will quickly be available for everyone and will be well-known in the medical community. (See Chapter 6 for prescription substances—what they do and do not do. None of them provide cures despite their antiviral properties or immunological effects.) Link: http://www.stpt.com/ and http://www.jasminedirectory.com/

When You Have a Rash

Keep the area clean and dry by washing with soap and water. Cleaning reduces the chances of secondary bacterial infections and drying kills surface virus and prevents a moist medium from developing, which can be helpful to the virus.

Bathing with Burow’s solution or other drying salts will do the same thing and also soothe inflammation. Dabbing alcohol or ether on external sores will serve as an antiseptic. Some people find this helpful in the early stages of an outbreak. When sores have begun to heal, you may find this too abrasive on new tissue. Breaking the blisters with your hands, a pin or needle is very risky. It can help spread the virus around, introduce a bacterial complication, or cause another abrasion.

Bathing with Burow’s solution or other drying salts will do the same thing and also soothe inflammation. Dabbing alcohol or ether on external sores will serve as an antiseptic. Some people find this helpful in the early stages of an outbreak. When sores have begun to heal, you may find this too abrasive on new tissue. Breaking the blisters with your hands, a pin or needle is very risky. It can help spread the virus around, introduce a bacterial complication, or cause another abrasion.

Most antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other creams or ointments are not recommended. Though they can protect against other infections or reduce inflammation, their cream or oil base might actually provide a good medium for the virus to thrive. For example, Vaseline jelly would simply seal the area and protect the virus from drying, therefore, retarding healing.

Eat well and take a multivitamin supplement that includes B and C vitamins. Unless you have a specific nutritional or immunological deficiency and are under the care of a physician, don’t take large doses of single vitamins. That will only benefit the profits of the producers and give your body something else to adjust to besides herpes.

Sleep well and don’t do anything destructive to your body. Drinking too much alcohol will slow healing, as will too much coffee, too many cigarettes, and long, late evenings. Relax.

It is important to remember that physical or mental stress acts to deplete one’s body resources. Reducing stress is a large topic which I will leave until Chapter 9. At this point, recognizing stressful tension as an enemy of fast healing is an important first step. Recognizing what specifically is stressful to you is a little more difficult.

The Placebo Effect

You’ll notice I do not recommend any drug or nutritional substance to apply, inject or otherwise treat herpes rashes.

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